We'll see | Matt Zimmerman

a potpourri of mirth and madness

QCon London 2010: Day 3

The tracks which interested me today were “How do you test that?”, which dealt with scenarios where testing (especially automation) is particularly challenging, and “Browser as a Platform”, which is self-explanatory.

Joe Walker: Introduction to Bespin, Mozilla’s Web Based Code Editor

I didn’t make it to this talk, but Bespin looks very interesting. It’s “a Mozilla Labs Experiment to build a code editor in a web browser that Open Web and Open Source developers could love”.

I experimented briefly with the Mozilla hosted instance of Bespin. It seems mostly oriented for web application development, and still isn’t nearly as nice as desktop editors. However, I think something like this, combined with Bazaar and Launchpad, could make small code changes in Ubuntu very fast and easy to do, like editing a wiki.

Doron Reuveni: The Mobile Testing Challenge

Why Mobile Apps Need Real-World Testing Coverage and How Crowdsourcing Can Help

Doron explained how the unique testing requirements of mobile handset application are well suited to a crowdsourcing approach. As the founder of uTest, he explained their approach to connecting their customers (application vendors) with a global community of testers with a variety of mobile devices. Customers evaluate the quality of the testers’ work, and this data is used to grade them and select testers for future testing efforts in a similar domain. The testers earn money for their efforts, based on test case coverage (starting at about $20 each), bug reports (starting at about $5 each), and so on. Their highest performers earn thousands per month.

uTest also has a system, uTest Remote Access, which allows developers to “borrow” access to testers’ devices temporarily, for the purpose of reproducing bugs and verifying fixes. Doron gave us a live demo of the system, which (after verifying a code out of band through Skype) displayed a mockup of a BlackBerry device with the appropriate hardware buttons and a screenshot of what was displayed on the user’s screen. The updates were not quite real-time, but were sufficient for basic operation. He demonstrated taking a picture with the phone’s camera and seeing the photo within a few seconds.

Dylan Schiemann: Now What?

Dylan did a great job of extrapolating a future for web development based on the trend of the past 15 years. He began with a review of the origin of web technologies, which were focused on presentation and layout concerns, then on to JavaScript, CSS and DHTML. At this point, there was clear potential for rich applications, though there were many roadblocks: browser implementations were slow, buggy or nonexistent, security models were weak or missing, and rich web applications were generally difficult to engineer.

Things got better as more browsers came on the scene, with better implementations of CSS, DOM, XML, DHTML and so on. However, we’re still supporting an ancient implementation in IE. This is a recurring refrain among web developers, for whom IE seems to be the bane of their work. Dylan added something I hadn’t heard before, though, which was that Microsoft states that anti-trust restrictions were a major factor which prevented this problem from being fixed.

Next, there was an explosion of innovation around Ajax and related toolkits, faster javascript implementations, infrastructure as a service, and rich web applications like GMail, Google Maps, Facebook, etc.

Dylan believes that web applications are what users and developers really want, and that desktop and mobile applications will fall by the wayside. App stores, he says, are a short term anomaly to avoid the complexities of paying many different parties for software and services. I’m not sure I agree on this point, but there are massive advantages to the web as an application platform for both parties. Web applications are:

  • fast, easy and cheap to deploy to many users
  • relatively affordable to build
  • relatively easy to link together in useful ways
  • increasingly remix-able via APIs and code reuse

There are tradeoffs, though. I have an article brewing on this topic which I hope to write up sometime in the next few weeks.

Dylan pointed out that different layers of the stack exhibit different rates of change: browsers are slowest, then plugins (such as Flex and SilverLight), then toolkits like Dojo, and finally applications which can update very quickly. Automatically updating browsers are accelerating this, and Chrome in particular values frequent updates. This is good news for web developers, as this seems to be one of the key constraints for rolling out new web technologies today.

Dylan feels that technological monocultures are unhealthy, and prefers to see a set of competing implementations converging on standards. He acknowledged that this is less true where the monoculture is based on free software, though this can still inhibit innovation somewhat if it leads to everyone working from the same point of view (by virtue of sharing a code base and design). He mentioned that de facto standardization can move fairly quickly; if 2-3 browsers implement something, it can start to be adopted by application developers.

Comparing the different economics associated with browsers, he pointed out that Mozilla is dominated by search through the chrome (with less incentive to improve the rendering engine), Apple is driven by hardware sales, and Google by advertising delivered through the browser. It’s a bit of a mystery why Microsoft continues to develop Internet Explorer.

Dylan summarized the key platform considerations for developers:

  • choice and control
  • taste (e.g. language preferences, what makes them most productive)
  • performance and scalability
  • security

and surmised that the best way to deliver these is through open web technologies, such as HTML 5, which now offers rich media functionality including audio, video, vector graphics and animations. He closed with a few flashy demos of HTML 5 applications showing what could be done.

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Written by Matt Zimmerman

March 12, 2010 at 17:14

One Response

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  1. More highlights from this QCon can be found at http://www.infoq.com/articles/qconlondon-2010-summary

    Matt Zimmerman

    April 7, 2010 at 22:25


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